This is the Perfect Mug ☕️ for a Bibliophile!

This ☕️ mug offered by the Newberry Library is embellished with vintage bookplate illustrations. 11 oz. of Newberry collections history! Enjoy a beverage from a mug showing a collage of bookplates featuring various Newberry’s collections. (And that gentleman in the frame? None other than our founder, Walter Loomis Newberry.)

The Rosenberg Bookshop is proud to be an independent purveyor of literary gifts, cards, and toys by local artisans. You’ll also find an exceptional notecard and postcard assortment and, of course, stellar books.

A really a clever idea and a great gift for your favorite Bibliophile 📚

Find A New Book With Internet Archive’s Online Library Explorer

Although it cannot quite replace the crinkling noise of book covers, the website Internet Archive is working to bring the thrill of browsing library shelves to the safety of your own home. Their Library Explorer allows users to browse 3D shelves by subject, age, date, and other sorting criteria. While you could just search for a title you already know, the magic of library shelves—real and virtual—is discovering new reads.
— Read on mymodernmet.com/internet-archive-library-explorer/

Dark Side of Wonderland: Ahead of V&A Museum Show, New Book Explores Alice in Wonderland

As the Victoria & Albert Museum prepares to celebrate Lewis Carroll’s heroine, ties to mysticism and magical societies have come to light in a new work, Through a Looking Glass Darkly

Great art spawns imitation. And great weird art, it seems, spawns still weirder flights of fancy. Lewis Carroll’s twin children’s fantasies, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There have both inspired a string of adaptations, artistic and musical responses down the generations.

Now, as the Victoria & Albert Museum prepares to celebrate Alice and her cultural influence in Curiouser & Curiouser, a landmark exhibition next month, a new book containing unseen original images is to expose the secrets behind the darker world of the second Alice story.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

“Together these books are really the first psychedelic texts and I like them because there’s no moral lesson. They actually parody authority, like the judiciary and the monarchy, rather than supporting them,” said Jake Fior, an Alice expert and author of Through a Looking Glass Darkly. “Carroll had a definite interest in the esoteric. I have a catalogue of his possessions, including his library, and he had lots of books on the supernatural,” he told the Observer. Fior’s fresh version of Alice’s journey attempts to elaborate and even improve upon Carroll’s difficult follow-up work, 150 years on from its publication.

“If you think about the structure of Through the Looking Glass, it’s very weird and I always felt it could be improved. The idea of going through a mirror into a reflected dimension is fine, but then suddenly there is this Jabberwocky epic poem and the Vorpal sword and these mythical beasts which are never mentioned again. It is framed as a chess game in which Alice goes from pawn to queen in eight chapters, but it doesn’t run in a fluid way like Wonderland. It is a more flawed book, yet some of the moments are better, so I kept those in my version.” During the author’s research for his new approach to the story he discovered images that will now go on public display for the first time in the V&A show.

Fior, who is the proprietor of the Alice through the Looking Glass shop in the West End of London, was already the owner of several original pieces of Carroll memorabilia when he came across a sketch book that had belonged to Carroll’s famous original illustrator, Sir John Tenniel.

“It shouldn’t have been there, but I was at a rare book fair three summers ago and there it was, nondescript, with just the word ‘costume’ written on the front,” remembered Fior. As a student Tenniel used to skip his classes at the Royal Academy of Art and take his sketch books to the British Museum instead. This book was full of studies of armour and knights, prototypes of the images he went on to use in the Alice books.

Fior uses these images in his book just as Carroll used Tenniel’s work: a dynamic mix of text and illustration, which he believes looks towards the arrival of the graphic novel. Fior’s story tells, in parallel with Alice’s journey, the true story of Samuel Liddell Mathers, a distant relative of the real girl Alice who had inspired Dodgson.

Fior discovered that he had formed the secret magical society known as The Golden Dawn, patronised by major literary figures such as Bram Stoker, E Nesbit and Arthur Conan Doyle, and also by the notorious occultist Aleister Crowley.

“There is no evidence that Carroll was practising magic, but he was interested in telepathy and was a member of the Society of Psychical Research. He also had a well known obsession with wordplay and especially acrostics, and these come from Hebrew mysticism, which he would probably have known,” said Fior.

While working on the book he found that although Carroll was not a Freemason, the Liddell family were very involved in the organisation. The V&A exhibition, Fior suggests, will be a good opportunity for fans to go back to the darker side of the stories, something that the Disney cartoon version has almost obliterated. “The Disney image has become so strong, it has almost effaced Tenniel. But I find the animated visuals a bit saccharine. I always think of the phrase from Anthony Burgess’s Clockwork Orange “weak tea, new brewed” as opposed to the Tenniel which is full strength, with no sugar.”

1916 Set of Elbert Hubbard’s Little Journeys Books

This lovely early 1900s set of books is for sale!

14 Volume set – PLUS: Guide Book and Biography of Hubbard (making this a set of 16 books)

This is a collection of biographical pieces written by Elbert Hubbard, and published monthly starting in 1894. The pieces were collected and republished in a 14-volume Memorial Edition in 1916, shortly after his death. The first volume includes a memoir of the author, and the last volume includes an index to the entire set. 14 Volume set – PLUS: Guide Book and Biography of Hubbard (making this a set of 16 books).

  • V. 1. Good Men and Great;
  • V. 2. Famous Women;
  • V. 3. American Statesmen;
  • V. 4. Eminent Painters;
  • V. 5. English Authors;
  • V. 6. Eminent Artists;
  • V. 7. Eminent Orators;
  • V. 8. Great Philosophers;
  • V. 9. Great Reformers;
  • V. 10. Great Teachers;
  • V. 11. Great Businessmen;
  • V. 12. Great Scientists;
  • V. 13. Great Lovers;
  • V. 14. Great Musicians.

Features the following (and more):

Jane Austen – Empress Josephine – Mary W. Shelley – William Shakespeare – Thomas A. Edison – George Washington – Benjamin Franklin – Thomas Jefferson – Samuel Adams – Michelangelo – Rembrandt – Rubens – Gustave Dore – Richard Wagner – Paganini – Frederic Chopin – Robert Schumann – Sebastian Bach – Felix Mendelssohn – Franz Liszt – Ludwig van Beethoven – George Handel – Giuseppe Verdi -Wolfgang Mozart – Johannes Brahms

Take a short video tour of this set with the Solitary Bibliophile

Elbert Hubbard had been influenced by the ideas of William Morris on a visit to England. He was unable to find a publisher for his book Little Journeys, so inspired by Morris’s Kelmscott Press, decided to set up his own private press to print the book himself, founding Roycroft Press. Roycroft was a reformist community of craft workers and artists which formed part of the Arts and Crafts movement in the United States. Elbert Hubbard founded the community in 1895, in the village of East Aurora, New York.

Interested in purchasing this set? Have questions? Please leave a comment below or send me an email.

Ruth Montgomery on Reincarnation – Book Lot

REINCARNATION – Lot of two vintage paperback books on the afterlife or reincarnation by Ruth Montgomery:

  • Published in 1968 and 1972.
  • Paperback books in good condition, some wear from age and use.
  • Price is for the pair of books together.

A World Beyond
From beyond the grave comes a startling message from one of the world’s most renowned psychics, a message containing the answers to these questions and many more…What does happen after death? Where do you go? What is it like “over there?” What does it feel like to be out of our human shell? Do you see loved ones we have lost long ago? America’s best-known spiritualist medium has reached the other world. He has established contact with a “receiver” in this world–and has written this book.

Here and Hereafter
Have you lived before? Will you live again? Fascinating new revelations about the experience of reincarnation from one of today’s foremost psychic authorities.

Reviews:

“The many readers of Ruth Montgomery will follow avidly her discussions of the doctrine of karma and rebirth . . . she cites innumerable instances that seem, to her, persuasive evidence that we are indeed caught up in successive reincarnations, and always meaningfully. Ruth Montgomery’s sincerity, humility, and personal conviction are in evidence on every page, and readers of her A Gift of Prophecy and A Search for the Truth will not be let down.”Publishers Weekly

About the Author:
Ruth Montgomery became special Washington, D.C., correspondent for International News Service, and later syndicated columnist for Capital Letter King Features, Hearst Headline Service (1958-1968). Montgomery has received many awards for her newspaper work.

Montgomery’s first literary brush with psychic affairs occurred in the mid-1950s when she researched and wrote a series of newspaper articles debunking fraudulent mediums. Her next foray into the field was as a believer with the bestselling A Gift of Prophecy: The Phenomenal Jeanne Dixon (1965).

Montgomery herself developed psychic abilities at about this time. First via automatic handwriting and then automatic typewriting, Montgomery began to communicate with “Lily and the group”—beings who claimed to be spirits of the dead and Montgomery’s guides. To prove their veracity, the guides dictated much information previously unknown to Montgomery, which she was later able to verify.

From 1960 to 1969, Montgomery worked with her guides to produce A Search for the Truth and Here and Hereafter. The first treats Montgomery’s own spiritual progress, and the second karma and reincarnation. In 1969, satisfied that death is not the end of individuality and busy with other projects, Montgomery abandoned automatic typewriting. Early in 1971, however, on discovering that Arthur Ford, her recently deceased friend and a world-famous medium, had become one of her guides, Montgomery recommenced taking spirit dictation. The new communications, now from “Lily, Art and the group,” provided the basis for A World Beyond: A Startling Message from the Eminent Psychic Arthur Ford From Beyond the Grave (1970, 1988), Companions Along the Way (1974, 1985), A World Before (1976, 1982), and Strangers Among Us: Enlightened Beings from a World to Come (1979, 1982). These books discuss, respectively, the circumstances of life after death, Montgomery’s previous incarnations, the past history of the world, and the near future prospects of humanity.

[Biographical Source: Enyclopedia.com]

Stephen King Country by George Beahm

Stephen King Country: The Illustrated Guide to the Sites and Sights That Inspired the Modern Master of Horror by George W. Beahm

  • Publisher: Running Press;
  • First Edition, First Printing.
  • Black binding, red gilt titles
  • Hardcover, 44 pages, illustrated throughout, resources, index
  • Condition: Dustjacket present (not price-clipped), some edgewear.
  • Bumped lower corners, just a few places highlighted in the chapter regarding his first edition and rare books.

Discover the real-life sites and sights behind his horror classics, including the Stanley Hotel of Estes Park, Colorado (site of The Shining’s eerie Overlook Hotel), King’s home town of Durham, Maine (the inspiration for Salem’s Lot), and more. An illustrated biography on King and his home town. Looks at the world in which author Stephen King lives and the real-life places that inspired the settings for some of his most popular works.

Helga Weyhe, Germany’s Oldest Bookseller, Dies at 98

She died above the bookstore, founded in 1840, where she had worked since the waning months of World War II. She locked it up for the last time in December.

BERLIN — After Helga Weyhe locked up her bookstore in the town of Salzwedel, Germany, each evening, she would make her usual commute — a trudge to the apartment upstairs. She had been making the same trip since World War II, just as her father had before then, and as her grandfather had before him.

The H. Weyhe Bookstore is one of the oldest bookstores in Germany. It was founded in 1840, before Germany was a country. Ms. Weyhe’s grandfather Heinrich Weyhe bought it 31 years later. It endured through World War I, the Weimar Republic, the Nazi regime. Ms. Weyhe took over the store from her father in 1965, four years after East Germany built the Berlin Wall, and guided it through Communist rule and reunification with West Germany.

She locked up for the last time one day in December. She died at 98 sometime before Jan. 4; her body was found in her home, said Ute Lemm, a grandniece.

“With her life, she closed a circle,” Ms. Lemm said. “She died where she was born.”

Helga Weyhe (pronounced VIE-eh) became an anchor in Salzwedel, about 110 miles west of Berlin. The town was in the former East Germany, and during Communist rule she stocked religious books that were unavailable in state-run bookstores, frowned on as they were by the regime. It was a boon to the faithful, and for her a quiet act of defiance.

Ms. Weyhe was a lifeline of sorts to her customers. She traveled far and wide after East Germans were generally allowed to leave for tourism, bringing back her infectious enthusiasm for the outside world. “She brought a little bit of the world to Salzwedel,” Ms. Lemm said. When the Iron Curtain was dissolved and those who had fled to the West returned to Salzwedel, they gathered at her store for readings she had organized.

Helga Weyhe in her bookstore in Salzwedel, Germany, in 2018. Her grandfather bought the store in 1871.Credit…John MacDougall/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

“They had bought their school books at the Weyhes’ when they were kids, and now, when they came back to the city, they were senior citizens,” Steffen Langusch, the town archivist, said. He held long conversations with Ms. Weyhe about local history in her office at the back of the store, amid piles of books and black and white photographs chronicling the store’s past.

Bookstores hold a special place for many Germans. During the pandemic lockdown, some were classified as “essential” businesses; the country’s 3,500 small, independent booksellers (compared with 2,500 in the United States) have been buoyed by a law that fixes book prices, preventing the small shops from being undercut by large chains and Amazon.

Ms. Weyhe in 2012 was the first resident after reunification to be formally honored by the town, the equivalent of receiving a key to the city, and in 2017 she received a special national prize for her bookstore.

“She wasn’t just an honorary citizen,” the town’s mayor, Sabine Blümel, said. “She was an institution.”

The store’s interior, with its well-stocked wooden shelves and display tables, has not changed much since Ms. Weyhe’s grandfather renovated it around 1880. Ms. Weyhe printed out quotations and poems and stuck them to the shop windows for the benefit of passers-by.

She took pride in stocking only books that she knew and approved of, although she would order customers almost anything online from her suppliers.

As she told interviewers over the years, one of her favorites was a 1932 children’s book by Erika Mann, Thomas Mann’s daughter, called “Stoffel Flies Over the Sea,” about a boy who tries to visit his uncle in America by hiding in a zeppelin.

“It was probably the last bookstore in Germany where you could always buy a copy of that book,” Mr. Langusch said.

The book’s plot appealed to her personally. Ms. Weyhe’s Uncle Erhard lived in Manhattan and ran his own bookstore, at 794 Lexington Avenue, near East 61st Street. His obituary in The New York Times in 1972 described him as “one of the last of the great art book dealers.” An old sign with the Lexington Avenue address hung on one of the shelves in Ms. Weyhe’s bookstore.

“Since she was a little girl, she dreamed of going to the States, but she had to wait her entire adult life until she was retirement age,” in the 1980s, said her grandniece Ms. Lemm, the artistic director of a theater.

Helga Weyhe was born on Dec. 11, 1922, to Walter and Elsa (Banse) Weyhe. Her mother also worked in the store. She graduated from high school in 1941 and was the first woman, and only the second person, in her family to attend university, studying German and history at institutions in Vienna and what was then Königsberg and Breslau.

With the war cutting short her studies, she went to work at the bookstore in 1944.

Ms. Weyhe never married and left no immediate survivors. Her extended family is hoping to find a new manager for the bookstore.

ORIGINAL POST CREDIT: Christopher F. Schuetze | NY TIMES

Haverhill’s Museum of Printing Receives Donation of Book Pages from the 1700s

Museum of Printing has received the donation of a major collection of rare book pages comes from the descendants of Dr. Arthur Klein, an accomplished collector.

While Klein was a gifted psychotherapist who worked at McLean Hospital and maintained a private practice in Cambridge,he amassed over 30 years a collection of 1,500 pages from art and science books published during the 1700s, the Age of Enlightenment. The illustrations in these books advanced the art of engraving and documented the advancement of science and technology.

The Museum is cataloging these artifacts and plans an exhibit next summer with lectures that explain the importance of these historic pages.

Read more and see the photos >>

A Peek Behind the Fences: Inside Alderman Library’s Renovations

Major renovation of the University of Virginia’s Alderman Library will continue throughout 2021 and 2022. Preparation got underway last January, and not long after the coronavirus pandemic closed the Grounds in March, the project began in earnest. The new and old stacks were demolished over the Summer…

📚 📖

The Rare Book School and the Bibliographical Society of UVA will also be on this floor, creating an area that is devoted to the care and preservation of the book.

Read the original article and view all of the progress photos here:

https://news.virginia.edu/content/peek-behind-fences-inside-alderman-librarys-renovations

Antique Illustrated Book: The Pilgrim’s Progress (early 1900s)

  • Title: The Pilgrim’s Progress, with illustrations in color
  • Author: John Bunyan
  • Publisher: Gilbert H. McKibbin, New York
  • Publication Date: No date – Circa 1900
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • Book Condition: Good, some wear to covers

192 pages. Cloth embossed binding with 28 color illustrated plates.

The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World, to That Which Is to Come is a 1678 Christian allegory written by John Bunyan. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of religious, theological fiction in English literature. It has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print..

#books #antique #parable #illustrated #historical #allegory

Experts Search for Rare Newton book, Three Copies in Canadian University Libraries

Tucked away in three university libraries across Canada are first edition copies of a book that experts say contains the building blocks of science. Prof. Mordechai Feingold of the California Institute of Technology and Andrej Svorencik of the University of Mannheim in Germany are looking for more copies of Sir Isaac Newton’s “Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy” in private collections. The two experts in September published a paper in their “attempt to locate all surviving copies” of the first edition of Newton’s book.

Many people believe that the book, published in 1687, was “so complicated” that no one read it, Feingold said. By tracing the ownership of first editions, the scientists want to show that not only was the book read but it was also understood.

“I mean, not necessarily as Newton did, but sufficiently to build on,” he said in an interview.

A census of the book published in 1953 showed there were 189 copies scattered around the world but a new estimate puts the number at 386.

Dalhousie, McGill and the University of Toronto each have a copy of the 510-page leather-bound book.

Karen Smith, special collections librarian at Dalhousie in Halifax, said the school’s copy was donated in 1934 by William Inglis Morse, who spent most of his adult life travelling, collecting and visiting libraries.

She said Morse believed books should be “handed on as a heritage of the ages.”

The copy at McGill University in Montreal was donated in 1911 by Sir William Osler, a renowned physician, as part of his 8,000-title collection.

The University of Toronto’s Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library purchased a copy from a bookseller in 1971 for less than $5,000, said science and medicine librarian Alexandra Carter.

Lauren Williams, the liaison librarian for the Blacker Wood Natural History Collection at McGill, said books during Newton’s time became smaller, so they were no longer large stationary objects.

“They’re lighter, they’re easier to carry around.”

Newton’s book is described as octave size or about 20 to 25 centimetres.

The binding can also tell a lot about the person who owned the book, Williams said. A wealthy person would use gold leaf on their bindings, while someone of modest means would get a simple binding.

Newton opted for a simple binding, which also says something about his approach to books being functional and practical, she said.

“These were not meant to be sort of luxurious items to be put on display,” Williams said.

Feingold said over the past 300 years since the book was published, it’s travelled to different parts of the world either because it was bought or bequeathed.

“It’s very interesting detective work to really try to trace the various owners of the book over the past,” he said. “There are many, many stories to be told about the book and the locations over the years.”

It’s also a book “that people treasure because it is by Newton,” he said, noting a copy in 2016 sold for US$3.7 million.

While digitized copies of the books are widely available, he said they don’t hold the “magical” quality of paper.

“You know, when you go through the pages you feel as if you are tracing the mind of a special individual and trying to figure out what and how he did it, right.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Jan. 1, 2020. Hina Alam, The Canadian Press